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WEBSITE MARKETING

If It Soudns Too Good To Be True
By: Developer Shed
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    2004-04-01

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    If It Sounds Too Good To Be True
    by James Capobianco


    You've heard that cliche over and over I'm sure, but it has
    never been more true than it is on the Internet.

    With this in mind, I randomly pulled the following ads out of
    ezines and newsletters. These are real ads and quoted exactly
    how they were written. I couldn't make this stuff up!

    If you examine the copy, for the most part they don't even
    make sense. So I thought I would poke a little fun at them and
    expose them for what they are a joke, and if taken seriously, a
    cruel joke at that!

    The sad part is that many people buy into the hype in the hopes
    of changing their lives, only to find out that the only one
    benefited is the "hyper". If you have been victimize by some of
    these "Too Good to be True" ads, you are not alone, I have too!

    That's right, ME! I could say it was all in the name of
    research, but in truth, in my heart of hearts, I hoped that this
    was "the deal" that would turn my life around. Although I didn't
    get the benefits promised in the ads, I did learn the valuable
    lesson of the famous cliche.

    So here we go. My intentions are NOT to return the compliment by
    insulting any of the copywriters of the ads, but merely (with a
    little tongue in cheek) to read between the lines and have a
    some fun.

    Hype Ad #1:

    "Work from Home in PJs Using PC and add thousands per month to
    your income with absolutely NO Risks, GUARANTEED!"

    Why would I even want to work in my PJs? I know it's used
    metaphorically and is just an attention getter. The image it
    portrays, however, is less than professional and whether you work
    at home or at a corporate office for a Fortune 500 company, it's
    a business and should be run like one. Be comfortable, yes; but
    PJs?

    How about "add thousands per month to your income"? If
    that statement, itself, is not a stretch, how about adding
    "absolutely NO Risks" and then guaranteeing it. First of all,
    unless someone is going to hand you the money, how can they
    guarantee it to you? Secondly, in order to make that kind of
    money, in that time frame, you better believe your going to take
    some risks!

    Hype Ad #2:

    "Own A Computer? Put it to Work! Earn an extra $1500-$5000/mo
    p/t;"

    This ad gives a whole new meaning to "artificial intelligence".
    Not only can you have a computer working for you part time; but
    it will earn an unrealistic $1500-$5000 per month. Most people
    working full time, with or without the aid of a computer, don't
    make that kind of money.

    Hype Ad #3:

    "15,000 in 30 days!! HUGE amounts of CASH for everyone!!
    NO EXCEPTIONS!! Call..."

    $15,000 a month? That's $180,000 per year. That is a HUGE
    amount of cash. Not only a lot of money, but EVERYONE gets it?

    Well, I called, and I think the guy who answered the
    phone said: "Hello, US Mint. Where should we send money?"

    Hype Ad #4:

    "QUIT YOUR JOB & be your own boss! Could you use an extra
    $21,000/month? Sound impossible? It's not!"

    This sounds good. I want to quit my job and be my own boss.
    But...and it 's a BIG but. How do I support my family until I'm
    making "$21,000 a month"?

    This guy answered that question for us. "Sound impossible?" You
    bet it is!

    Hype Ad #5:

    "$100,000+ yearly income possible: Internet marketing
    guru will teach you the REAL way to wealth at home"

    "Possible", but not probable. Not without a lot of hard work and
    persistence. Why would this kind and generous person offer to
    teach me how to do this? If he was making $100,000 a year, he
    doesn't need to share the REAL way. Is there a FAKE way to
    wealth?

    Hype Ad #6:

    "Escape The Rat Race - Make $300 Per Day Simply+Instantly
    No Selling Required"

    This starts off OK. There is nothing quite like being your own
    boss and calling the shots. Then this guy has to add
    "Simply+Instantly. No Selling Required". Here we go again.
    Where IS this person who is giving all this money away just for
    the asking?

    Hype Ad #7:

    "Subject: MMake an EASY $100,000 per year!!! Are
    you looking to make an extra $1000-$5000 per week, with
    little time required on your part? If so we may have what
    you are looking for. We are a national company, and a
    leader in our industry. We are seeking several people in
    each area to represent our company with absolutely no
    selling."

    This one is a real winner! This guy is so excited about the
    offer, he gets "tongue tied" MMaking the pitch. Another
    incredible weekly income, no time required and no selling.
    There's that person who gives money away again. Why can't I find
    him? One more thing. Why would a national company, with all its
    resources, be advertising on the WWW for people in my area to
    represent them? Wouldn't you think they would be able to more
    effectively recruit in a specific area?

    Hype Ad #8:

    "Establish A Second Income An Income With No Work, Its
    True, Free to Join"

    I saved the best for last. This is my kind of business. An
    income with "no work"? Come on! Do I look like I just fell off
    the turnip truck? This guy is however, giving us some credit, in
    case we aren't buying it, he adds "It's True". Like this will
    make me believe it. "Well OK, if he says it's true, it must be."

    Well folks, these are just eight of the many ridiculous and
    unbelievable ads that claim "fame and fortune" on the
    Internet is yours for "No Work, No Selling and No Risk" not to
    mention all the "Hugh Amounts of FREE Cash" your going to get
    "Instantly".

    Why do these marketers insult our intelligence with ads like
    these?

    I, for one, believe that people are more intelligent than these
    guys give them credit for. I believe that with a little common
    sense, people will stop and think before they spend their hard
    earned money to buy into the "hype". Remember, the only person
    that's going to get rich, is the person selling the hype!


    ------------------- About the Author ---------------------------

    James Capobianco has been self-employed for over 25 years, both
    on and offline. At his web site, Cap-Tech.com, and in his
    newsletter, The Cap-Tech Times, he shares his experience and
    expertise when it comes to owning your own business. Come pay a
    visit at http://www.cap-tech.com?art10>
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